Ivory Mix Stock

CXL Conversion Rate Optimization: Conversion Research Review

Whoa, on my 7th week already! I’m so happy that I was able to pass the Landing Page Optimization quiz.

So, this week, I’m reviewing the Conversion Research course for CXL Institute’s Conversion Rate Optimization minidegree program. For this week, we’ll be tackling Conversion Research. 

After all, research is the foundation of high conversions. The more you know your customer, the better you’ll understand and meet his or her needs through your services and products. And eventually, you’ll get him or her buying from you. 

 

Conversion Research

As you might know, there’s a lot of data you need to gain important insights and improve conversions for your website. But how much data do we need? What kind of data do we need? 

In the first part of the conversion research course, CXL founder Peep Laja discussed the Research XL Model.

It has 6 steps which we’ll be talking about briefly:

  • Heuristic Analysis

 

If you’ve read my previous blog post on product messaging,  you’d know about the Heuristic formula that basically tells you which factors contribute to conversions.

 

But in this step, we’re talking more about assessing the site page by page based on the user experience. There are features that affect  the user experience and therefore conversions: clarity, friction,anxiety, and distraction.

First off, we have clarity. Clarity is asking if everything is clear and easily understood. Are the directions simple? Do you understand what the page is all about?

 

Friction is what’s preventing the user from going through the customer journey. Are the forms too detailed? Are some parts of the page not working right?

 

Next, anxiety is what’s bothering people. For instance, is there a guarantee that can lower the risk for them? 

 

Lastly, there’s distraction. If there’s too much going on, chances are, the user will feel too overwhelmed and stuck. He or she will probably leave the page.

 

  • Technical Analysis

 

Technical Analysis involves taking at the browsers, errors, bugs, and of course, site speed. Yes, the slower the site speed, the more likely people will bounce off your site.

 

  • Digital Analytics

 

In order to make most of your optimization efforts, you need to find out where the problems are. We don’t want to be leaking money, right?

 

To do this, you need to check your Google Analytics or whatever kind of digital analytics you have.

 

When you deep dive, take note of where exactly people are dropping off. Where is the friction point? 

 

Moreover, you want to understand and connect certain behaviors with outcomes. Like, if they are reading a lot of your blog posts, do they continue to buy after skimming through them? Do the people who use your filters actually convert?

 

Lastly, you need to make sure the measurements are reliable and verifiable. According to him 90% of the analytics configurations he’s seen are broken.

 

  • Qualitative Research

 

When it comes to gaining insight, he suggests 2 kinds of surveys. First, we have on-site polls. You first do it on a product page, like asking them what’s stopping them from buying a certain product. On the other hand, if it’s on a check out page, the concerns would be security and privacy.

 

Peep recommends that you do on-site polls for all your pages.

 

The second type of survey that’s useful for qualitative research is the post conversion survey. We want to ask the people who have recently bought from us about their shopping experience. You can send them a survey maybe a couple of hours after with 8-10 open ended questions.

 

  • User Testing

 

For this step you ask people to use your website and share their experiences as they’re completing specific tasks. For example, they need to find a certain product in your store. You gauge the time they take to do the task and if they encounter any difficulties or error messages.

 

  • Mouse Tracking Analysis

 

Take a look at where your users are tapping or clicking. Peep Laja, the hovering action is okay but not so useful.

 

What’s next after doing research?

 

After doing your research, you collect all your data and list problems you found. Next, you need to prioritize which issues to tackle first. CXL Founder Peep Laja suggests a five star rating/ scale wherein 5 means a major concern. For example when it comes to usability, if the issue impacts a lot of your visitors or customers then it’s a 5.

 

He also suggests categorizing the issues that you have. Then make testing programs to solve them.

 

His best advice is follow the money which means fix the parts that are leaking money right away. 

 

Lastly, he shared 3 key metrics that are crucial in determining the effectiveness of your testing program:

  1. Testing velocity

The quicker you test, the more you learn, the quicker you solve the issue and grow your business.

  1. Percentage of tests that provide a win

Of course, you need to make tests based on the issues your customers are already experiencing so that it can have a significant difference versus your previous situation. 

  1. Impact per successful experiment

 This depends on your current situation. If your site for example looks like it was from the 80s, then there’s a lot to do but it’s going to have a big impact on your site.

 

Final Thoughts For This Week

 

I must say I find the brief explanations about the 6 steps for ResearchXL pretty straightforward. Since most of the information is found in other courses in this minidegree, it’s more like a summary of the critical elements you need for conversion optimization.

 

What I really enjoyed is everything looks so simple. The importance of surveys, content reports, chat, and customer service were also tackled. 

 

Overall, the lessons were organized from an overview to a very detailed explanation. I just wish that there were slide decks for the lessons. That would make it easier for us students to summarize each section.

 

 I’m enjoying getting into the nitty gritty since research is something I’m very comfortable with. I think my biggest takeaway is not to based research on what you think your customers need but what they actually need. Looking forward to more insights.

 

laptop-screen-mockup(2)

CXL Conversion Rate Optimization: Landing Page Optimization Review

And just like that, I’m on my 6th week of studying CXL Institute’s Conversion Rate Optimization minidegree program. 

This week was pretty busy for me so I only got to go through Landing Page Optimization. The instructor for this course is Michael Aagard and it takes about 4 hours to go through the whole thing.

I’ll be sharing my insights and observations about this course. This course covers the basics,  research, and user psychology needed to optimize your landing page.

But first, let’s talk about what a landing page is.

Landing Page: Definition

Technically speaking, a landing page is a page where a visitor lands on. So you can consider the first page of a website or a single page to get email addresses a landing page.

A landing page is structured and designed to convert a stranger or target audience into a lead. It has a specific offer to persuade the person to sign up to opt into an email list.

Here are some definitions from the course:

  • It’s where a user lands on
  • It’s the first page the user sees after clicking on an ad
  • It’s a page that works and stands on its own regardless of the site or app
  • It’s focused on one conversion goal

A good landing page needs to follow up on the promise seen on the ad it’s connected to. Moreover, it needs to answer relevant questions, show clarity, and address user objections.

When there’s too much going on or the page is asking a lot of information or action on the part of the user, it won’t be effective.

Usually, the landing page experience goes through this path

Search→Ad→Landing Page→Form→Confirmation

People search for something on Google right? Then at the top of the search engine result pages (SERPs) you’ll see an ad for something. As soon as the user clicks, he or she gets taken to a landing page where he learns about the offer. Now, if the landing page is optimized, the person would opt into the email list or sign up in the form. 

 

Landing Page Optimization at a Glance

In the course, there are 6 steps to optimize the landing page:

  1. Conducting research
  2. Forming and validating a hypothesis
  3. Creating a treatment
  4. Starting an experiment
  5. Analyzing the data gathered
  6. Making a follow-up experiment

 

First, let’s talk about research. Research is the foundation of any landing page.

Now, there are two kinds of research done here. First, we have quantitative research which answers the questions “What?” and “Where?” do users leave the landing page without signing up on the form.

Second, we have qualitative research which answers “Why did the users exit the page without filling in the form?”

Fast Vs. Slow Thinking 

I think we touched upon these topics in previous posts but Michael wanted to show how these are important in landing page optimization.

Basically, we have two kinds of thinking: intuitive thinking and analytical thinking. For instance, for a math problem, it’s easy to answer 2×2 but it takes a while to compute 34 x25, right?

When it comes to the buying decision, most of us think quickly like will I buy this or not? (intuitive thinking) And when we do buy something, we need to justify it with logical reasons (analytical thinking).

Fast or intuitive thinking is automatic, subconscious, and in the moment. On the other hand, slow or analytical thinking takes a lot of effort, is logical, conscious, and involves planning ahead of time.

Michael then talks about the law of least effort. In short, we don’t like taking too much effort trying to understand something like for instance what a landing page is offering. We ask ourselves , “Is this worth my effort?”

Cognitive Biases

The instructor then shared some common cognitive biases such as priming, framing, and what you see is all there is.

Let’s start with priming. 

Priming states that exposing somebody to a stimulus influences his or her response to a subsequent stimulus. It’s like he’s getting himself or herself ready for what’s to come.

Next, there’s framing. Framing states that the way you present a message has a solid and direct impact on the way people perceive it.

He gave an example:

 Order Information and Prices vs. Get Information and Prices

The first headline is kind of vague and confusing, huh? But with the second one, it’s simple and clear. 

For this one, I would cite information hierarchy. The biggest and boldest font is what we see first. So, in our mind, it’s the most important one. Likewise, we don’t pay much attention to small letters. But please, still read the fine print.

Lastly, we have what you see is all there is. It’s like saying what you see get. This means you need to put all the information needed for the user to make a decision because they’d take it as is.

Dopamine and Cortisol

Dopamine is a feel good hormone. And in user psychology, people like it when their action is rewarded. This means you need to make sure that you deliver whatever it is you promise in your ad and in your form.

Meanwhile, cortisol is triggered when you’re stressed. If you make things difficult for the user, he or she may stop engaging with your site.

 

Final Thoughts

As with the previous courses I’ve taken, I enjoyed watching and learning about the lessons. They were organized and well presented.

I like that Michael really opened up Google Analytics to show where exactly you need to look to see what you need to improve. For instance, you need to take a look at the bounce rate and exit pages to understand better the what and where of your user’s actions.

However, I wish that the notes were a lot more detailed so that when you download them, you have a lot of information already. To be honest, I’m only more than halfway through this course but I can tell that it’s something that’s pretty handy to increase conversions. 

I love Michael’s energy and pace. He shares practical tips and his class is relatively easy to follow.

 

bright-boss(25)

CXL Conversion Rate Optimization Program: Google Analytics Review

Wow, time went by so fast. I can’t believe I’m on Week 5 already of CXL Institute’s Conversion Rate Optimization minidegree.

Well, this week, it’s a lot technical. I got through the basics of Google Analytics and learned a ton of terms like account, views, filters, and parameters. 

Yes, it was quite overwhelming, to be honest. But I powered through and passed the proficiency exam at the end. Whew!

The Basics of Google Analytics takes about 8 hours to complete! But in this post, I’ll just give you the gist of what this amazing and free tool is all about.

Anyway, shall we dive in?

Basics of Google Analytics

I’ve had a blog for 6 years and to be honest, I didn’t give much attention to my Google Analytics. I only learned some important insights from Google Academy for a job before then got into On-Page SEO.

Thankfully, this CXL’s CRO program has a comprehensive course to learn the basics. And Chris Mercer has a really fun presence in the videos. He sounds so enthusiastic that you’d forget that what he’s teaching is so technical.

First off, let’s compare these three helpful tools:

Google Analytics vs. Google Tag Manager vs. Google Data Studio

Google Analytics is a free tool that helps you store data from people’s interactions with your site. It’s able to make reports about the traffic, demographics, and behavior of your site visitors.

On the other hand, Google Tag Manager is in charge of collecting data. It can assign tags based on set rules. When you want to understand when people use a specific feature or click a button, you need tags.

Lastly, Google Data Studio is a free reporting tool that turns the data you have into informative and visually appealing reports and dashboards.

 

Types of Google Analytics Reports

There are so many kinds of reports in Google Analytics so we’ll focus on just a few significant ones and their importance.

By the way, these reports fall under 3 basic types: standard (default) reports, custom reports, and saved reports.

 

Standard Reports

The standard reports include real-time reports, audience reports, acquisition reports, behavior reports, and conversion reports.

Real-time reports are useful for you to know what’s happening on your website right now. So, it shows the live users and their activity.

Next, we have audience reports. Audience reports show characteristics of your audience such as their location, age, gender, interests, and device used.

After this, we have acquisition reports. These reports show where the website traffic came from. Did they use a keyword? Were they from a social media platform or ads?

On the other hand, behavior reports show which pages on the site the user visited and how much time they spent on these pages.

Last but not least, there are conversion reports. These reports show transactions of the user before the conversions. For instance, how many times did he or she visit or what channels they used before converting.

Custom Reports

If you need something that fits your business specifically, you might need custom reports since each business or organization has different goals and metrics. There are readily available ones or you can set your own metrics or dimensions.

Saved Reports

As for saved reports, you can use them on other reports so you can access them quickly.

Google Analytics Settings

When I first learned about accounts, properties, and views I was quite confused. These are the levels present in Google Analytics.

Account

You need one account to access Google Analytics. But an organization can have more than one account. Now, your account can handle one or more properties.

What are properties, you ask? Let’s discuss it next.

Property

In Google Analytics, a property is an entity where you want to collect data from. Usually, it’s a website, device, or mobile application.

Before you collect data, GA gives you a unique tracking code to embed into the site.

View

The smallest unit for the account settings is the view. This is the subset where you can apply your specific configurations. For example, you might use filters to exclude a specific kind of data.

 

Types of Traffic

 

In Google Analytics language, traffic is composed of your website visitors.

There are several types of traffic including direct, organic, paid, social, and referral traffic.

 

Direct Traffic

This refers to the visitors who type your URL in the address bar because they already know your website. It could also be someone who saw your promotions somewhere and typed your site address directly.

Organic Traffic

Meanwhile, organic traffic comes from keywords searched by people. For example, you have a gardening blog, and someone types “how to plant carrots”. If he or she clicks on your link and goes to your site to read the article, that’s organic traffic.

Paid Traffic

This type of traffic comes from ads whether it’s a paid search or display on Google. Make sure to check the landing pages for the ads and optimize them to get a high return for your ad spend.

Social Traffic

Another traffic source is social media. When you have a strong social media presence, many people would click the links on your profile and visit your site.

Referral Traffic

Lastly, these are the users that come from other sites. For example, if an authoritative site has an anchor text directed towards your site, you can get some link juice or referral traffic.

Understanding Goals

In Google Analytics, when an objective is met or an activity is completed, that’s considered a goal. 

There are four types of goals: destination, duration, pages/screens per session, and event.

The first type is when a specific page loads (ex. Thank you page) while the second one is when a specific time period is consumed.

In addition, pages per session is when a user views a certain number of pages. Lastly, the event goal is when the visitor does a specific action like clicking a video on a page.

 

Final Thoughts

I loved a  lot of things in the course. First, I appreciate that Chris Mercer used actual Google Analytics accounts to share information about this. The lessons were also organized and systematic, from an overview to the tiny details.

However, when I looked at the slides, I wish they were a little more detailed so that we can just understand the basic concepts simply by reading through the slides.

IMG_6932

CXL Conversion Rate Optimization: Social Proof, Neuromarketing, and Emotional Content Review

Time is so fast these days. Just like that, I’m in my fourth week of CXL Institute’s Conversion Rate Optimization Program.

And this week I got into a lot of lessons: Social Proof, Neuromarketing, and Emotional Content. So, I’m sharing with you what I learned from them.

Let’s dive in!

Social Proof

What do you think of when you hear social proof? Actually, it covers those that people say about a certain product or service. It comes from a third party so it’s unbiased.

 For instance, specific kinds of social proof include reviews, case studies, testimonials, and recommendations. For example, a famous celebrity endorsed your product. That can be social proof which can increase people’s trust.

In this course, Joel Klettke, a conversion copywriter, discusses how to gather, screen through, and display social proof to attract more customers and improve conversions.

You can gather relevant information from customers mainly from interviews or surveys.

Conducting Interviews

Now, let’s talk about interviews. If you want rich first-hand narratives about your product it’s best to have interviews with some of your customers.

Who is the ideal interviewee, you ask?

Well, he or she has three (3) main characteristics:

  1. Voluntarily and legally allowed to share his or her experience with regards to your offer
  2. He or she is part of your target market
  3. Has free time to do the interview (approx 45 to 1 hour)


What things should you remember during the interview?

First, make the interview free-flowing or conversational. Next, make the exchange follow this framework: before, during, after. 

For instance, you can ask ‘ what was going on in your life that prompted you to find a solution like ours/our product?” What did you like about our product that compelled you to use it instead of a competitor?” (before). “How was your experience purchasing the product?” (during) “What changed after you bought the product/ got the service?” (after)

Third, let your interviewees express themselves and not put words into their mouths. Lastly, you can repeat asking the same question. It’s not redundant.

Case Studies and Testimonials

So, two of the most common and effective social proof for your website are case studies and testimonials.

A case study is combining a personal or story with data. On the other hand, a testimonial is a statement from a customer that describes how a specific product has helped him or her.

What can these be used for?

They are useful for three things. First, they allow your visitors to select for themselves. When they land on your site, they can see your case studies and testimonials and think, “Is this relevant to me?” 

Next, it brings about empathy. When people share their struggle and how a certain product helped them address this pain point, your prospective customers might be able to relate and therefore take action as well.

Lastly, they can act as a point of interest. Social proof can draw people in. Some websites even use a testimonial above the fold just to highlight how much impact a product has had on someone’s life,  how it made their life better.

The best social proof is specific and shows the “before, during, and after” arc. Simply saying, “this product is the best” won’t be enough. And as you know, what counts really is the story. We all love a good story of how you changed from zero to hero by using product X.

By the way, when you include testimonials, it’s better if you have their first name, image and website. Some companies actually now go for video testimonials.

What are the common mistakes when showing social proof?

  1. Not selecting an ideal customer. You need to show social proof that’s from your target market.
  2. Displaying proof in a way that doesn’t look credible. Remember to link to websites or include headshots.
  3. Not using the proof to reinforce a specific claim.

 

Neuromarketing

This interesting field covers 2 spectra: neuroscience and behavior. On one end, scientists are analyzing what’s happening inside the brain when they make decisions.

On the other hand, the behavior side concerns how we can use the data in the real world. How do we use how people think to influence their preferences and buying decisions.

Well, let’s talk about some schools of thought in neuromarketing.

Daniel Kahneman proposed that we, as humans, have two kinds of thinking systems. First, is quick and fast while the second one is slow and logical. 

 

Another one is evolutionary psychology shows that as modern as we are, we still have that hunter-gatherer tendency.

In neuromarketing, they use a lot of devices and techniques such as electroencephalogram (EEG), biometrics, and eye-tracking. Biometrics measures heart rate, blood pressure, and others.

 

Emotional Content

Emotions are a big chunk of marketing. Yes because we buy based on our emotions and justify our purchases with logical reasons.

Question is, “Are you using emotional triggers effectively?” 

The instructor for this course shared a 4-step framework you can use. 

First, emotional competitor analysis. For the competitor analysis, we need to understand mainly 4 things: message, color, image, and emotional trigger.

In her example, she used dating websites. Some of these sites have a message about being close and intimate, blue as their color, a variety of images, and hope as their emotional triggers.

Check out your competition. What are they using?

Second, emotional SWOT. This is when you analyze the strength, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats to your content strategy.

Third, building an emotional content strategy.  Did you know that there are 223 emotional triggers you could use? Ask yourself, “how would you like your customers to feel when they get to your site?”

Fourth, testing. Yes, you need to see if it’s working. Check these ones:

  • Emotions
  • Elements
  • Words
  • Visuals
  • Colors

 

Final Thoughts

I love that the lessons this week were short but organized. I was able to understand quickly how to use social proof to increase the trust and credibility of a product. 

 

Perhaps the best and most refreshing lessons were from emotional content strategy. I mean, I thought emotions were pretty relative, but Talia was able to share a systematic way of using emotions to make your conversion rates better. Pretty impressive!

Mint-Notes(10)

CXL Conversion Rate Optimization : Persuasive Psychology Review

This week, I was able to learn a lot about how psychology influences our buying decisions, and therefore conversions.

Yes, it’s my Week 3 of studying lessons in CXL Institute’s Conversion Rate Optimization Program. And it’s been really insightful.

Let’s dive in together, shall we?

People and Psychology

Peep Laja, CXL’s founder, is the instructor for this course. He starts off this course by discussing Cialdini’s 7 principles of persuasion, which I already tackled in my previous post. You can learn more about it here.

Fogg Behavior Model 

He then presented BJ Fogg’s Behavior model which shows three principal elements, namely: motivation, ability, and trigger working to influence changes in someone’s behavior.

For a change in behavior to happen, you want people to have high motivation, ask things that are easy to do, and set up triggers.

Now, let’s examine each element.

Motivation

First, we have motivation. This is why people do a certain action. In Fogg’s framework there are 3 core sources of motivation with opposing sides: pleasure/pain, hope/fear, and social acceptance/rejection.

When we talk about pleasure and pain, these are primitive motivators. A lot of marketing and advertising is either geared towards pleasure or avoiding pain. 

Next, hope and fear. Hope, according to Fogg, is the most powerful motivator. When you have hope, you’re anticipating a good outcome for your action. I mean, to be honest, I got a lot of the courses because they made me feel like being part of their course can help me get through a slump. Don’t we love things that make us feel hopeful?

I think that’s the reason why there are so many dating websites around too. What do you think?

The last of these core motivators is social rejection and acceptance. Just think of this, being a part of an elite group of copywriters. Isn’t that something? Or maybe an exclusive fitness group?

We all want to be part of a group. So, it’s really important that we think about it when we consider marketing and conversion strategies for our business.

Remember, you can increase someone’s motivation through persuasive copy but they have to have something there or else, it’s going to be very difficult for you to convince them to make the change.

Ability

Now, let’s talk about the how. Ability corresponds to whether something is easy to do or now. After all, we don’t want our would-be customers to feel frustrated. Simply put, let’s make it easy for them to do what we and they want to do. (hope you got that).

They want single clicks and easy forms to fill out. Believe it or not, it’s actually easier to make things easy than to boost motivation from your customers.

Trigger or Prompts

As the word implies, the trigger is what calls people to action. It’s that little orange “get this now!” button at the end of a sales copy or a “follow me on my social accounts to get more stories like this” spiel at the bottom of a post.

Even if the first two elements are through the roof, changes in behavior won’t happen for the customer without triggers.

With the right timing, people will even thank you for these prompts. Otherwise, you will come off as annoying.

 

Types of Triggers: Hot and Cold

Hot triggers are those that compel you to do the action now. For example, “get this now!” or “buy this.” On the other hand, cold triggers are advertisements all around. They don’t really push or persuade you to do an action instantly. 

Fogg says it’s better to use cold triggers for people that have high motivation.

Persuasion Techniques

CXL has a huge list of persuasion techniques but I’ll just share a few that I feel we all need to know as marketers. Moreover, they share several tips to use these techniques to optimize conversions

Focusing Effect

This technique states that we can only focus on a few things. So, when trying to sell a product, you need to focus on your unique selling proposition (USP) (3 at most). In addition, emphasize what makes you different from your competitors.

Context-Dependent Memory

Have you ever gone to the bedroom and as soon as you got there you forgot what you were looking for? But as you go back to the living room and see your daughter, you remember “I’m looking for her headband.”

This s because you now have a context of what you were looking for in the first place. It’s now easy for you to remember.

You can apply this to your website by making your logos, colors, and fonts consistent throughout your site. These contextual cues make it easier for people to recall your brand.

Another useful tip is retargeting. If someone abandoned a cart, it would be helpful for you to remind him or her about it via email, making use of the same images in the site.

Facial Distraction

Have you noticed that a lot of big brands make use of faces as you land on your site? This is because we love looking at faces, especially those of celebrities.

Now, are you taking advantage of this? 

In addition, you can use gaze cueing especially on your landing page. Make the face look at your most important element. And for sure, your potential customers will also pay attention to this.

Attentional Bias

This means we give our attention to those that affect us emotionally. So, you need to use phrases and words that highlight intense emotion – pain, fear, happiness, etc.

I’ll share with you next time insights on how to use emotional content and triggers throughout your site.

As for the things that don’t persuade, such as privacy policy and terms and conditions, place them away from the center of attention. 

Forer Effect

Last but not least in my list is the Forer effect. This means that we relate to generally positive traits mentioned. It’s like the page is talking about us.

You can apply this to your brand by highlighting that your product is perfect for a certain group of people. And be sure to use an authority figure to back this up.

Final thoughts

I didn’t realize how huge the impact human psychology has on persuading people and ultimately driving conversions. I’m excited to learn more about neuromarketing, social proof, and emotional content strategy next.

 

bright-boss(15)

CXL Conversion Rate Optimization: Product Messaging and Persuasion Review

So, I’m in my Week 2 diving into CXL Institute’s Conversion Rate Optimization Program. Last week, I got into the foundations of CRO and Conversion Copywriting.

This week I got more into the nitty-gritty with Product Messaging and Persuasion. 

And I think these are some of the most exciting copywriting lessons I’ve ever learned in copywriting.

Shall we start?

Product Messaging

Momoko Price, an established conversion copywriter, was my instructor for this course.

As an ecom copywriter, I find her course so informative and super organized.  I mean, she has these detailed spreadsheets that would be a lifesaver when you’re crunching for time.

How to Conduct A Copy “Teardown”

This is when you dissect your sales page copy to see if they follow certain elements. 

In this copy teardown, Momoko uses three (3) teardown elements to help you to increase conversions.

MecLab’s Heuristic Formula

First, we have MecLab’s Conversion Sequence Heuristic Formula which goes:

C = 4M + 3V + 2(I-F) – 2A

This formula shows that the probability of conversion (C) depends on the site visitor’s motivation (M), strength of the value proposition (V), friction (F) and anxiety(A) preventing them from taking action and the incentive(I) to counteract these negative factors.

Motivation, which is the factor you can’t control, focuses on desired outcomes, pain points/ problems, and purchase prompts. 

Next, we have the value proposition which means your product’s unique benefits and attractive features. Then incentives are those things you offer to sweeten the deal like free shipping or bonuses while friction is how hard it is to get where you want to get.

Lastly, anxiety are the visitor’s objections, risks, and uncertainties.

 

Cialdini’s 7 Principles of Influence

Next, she applies Cialdini’s 7 principles of influence.

  • Social proof

Your reviews and testimonials matter for people to trust your products

  • Authority

When people see your brand as an authority, they will trust you. So make sure to highlight celebrities or specific experts to support your brand

  • Liking

When your brand is likable, people will keep going back.

  • Scarcity

When something is scarce, the more people want it. It’s because they don’t want to lose the chance to change their lives.

  • Reciprocity

When you do something for your customer, they have a tendency to give something back. So if you give something of value, they’re likely to respond when you ask them to take action.

  • Unity

This is the “us against them” where you make the customer feel like you’re rallying against something together. It can be anything from climate change to fast food to stigmas.

 

Claude Hopkin’s Scientific Advertising

Lastly, we have a pioneer in advertising, Claude Hopkins. He has 4 rules:

  1. Be specific

Persuasive is clear and explicit. You can’t sell products if people don’t understand what it is and what it can do for them. Also, with any claims, you need to tell them the details or else you’d sound like any other product out there.

    2. Offer service

The best-performing ads are those that don’t ask people to buy but offer something like useful information or a sample for users to consume.

      3. Tell the full story

Don’t worry about the length. Tell them what happens after. Counteract risks with guarantees if needed. Don’t leave your customers nurturing their anxieties and doubts about your products.

      4. Be a sales(wo)man

Ask yourself, “Will this ad help me sell more of my products?”

 

Message Mining

Another important process to nail your product messaging is mining messages from your customers.

Use surveys/poll, one-on-one interviews, and remote user tests to make more compelling and persuasive sales copy.

I think my best takeaway from this lesson is to make sure to make 2 different questions for different audiences.

This means that you need to have a separate set of questions for those who are checking out your site (site visitors) and those who are already paying customers.

Make sure though that the pop-up survey for site visitors appears not immediately as they land on your site but about 5-9 secs.

What are the surveys for?

Well, the site visitor’s survey can show pain points, purchase prompts, and anxieties. On the other hand, the customer poll can show some ‘aha’ moments, desirable outcomes, and unique benefits they got from the product.

Unique Value Proposition

Your product/brand’s UVP answers the question “ Why should I buy from you and not anybody else?” Essentially, it’s giving people a reason to buy from you instead of your competitors.

What makes you different?

Think of your prospective customer as a skeptical person asking, “So what?” and then “Okay prove it.”

To do this you need to understand which specific product features either addresses a pain point or leads to a desirable outcome for your customer.

Message Hierarchies

This lesson emphasizes how stories are vital to selling. Your sales copy needs to have a story-based framework. 

First, there’s the setting or context. You do this by letting the people know who, what, and why (UVP). 

Next, the rising action or intensity. Here you share the features, benefits, proof, and how it works. Let them try.

Also part of this would be to address their uncertainties and perceived objections to buying

Then, we have the call-to-action (CTA) at the peak. Be sure to give the payoff.

Lastly, there’s the falling action. Here the customer completes the transaction and you need to take care of them post-conversion.

Now, another relevant question is “ How does your customer’s level of awareness” impact the length of your story or copy?”

I learned that the more aware your audience is about your product, the shorter the copy needs to be. In short, get out of their way. 

But if your audience is not yet aware of your products, then you need to use a longer story or copy to reel them in and get them to buy. 

Week 2  Final thoughts

What did I love about the lessons this week? I enjoyed Momoko’s practical copywriting insights, templates, and worksheets.

I think this is a must-have course for anybody who wants to go into copywriting. Next week, I’ll probably be sharing about People and Psychology, Social Proof, and Neuromarketing.

Stay tuned!




















c74-1-yellow-navy-styled-stock-photo-pixistock-scaled

CXL Conversion Rate Optimization Foundations: Review

I’m so excited that I got into CXL Institute’s Conversion Rate Optimization minidegree program. To be honest, I was at first intimidated because it’s such an extensive topic but I’m so thrilled that I started it.

CXL Institute is a world leader in teaching advanced digital marketing skills. Yes, it’s the only platform where the world’s top marketing experts teach about CRO/UX, marketing, and analytics.

So, I’d be sharing some of my thoughts and best takeaways from this week’s lessons on CRO foundations. By the way, the entire minidegree is about 85 hours of video and online learning material so it’s pretty comprehensive.

Conversion Rate Optimization (CRO)

As a direct response copywriter, I’m always excited about conversions. But interestingly, I didn’t realize how other factors such as product messaging, social proof, and UX design affect conversion rates. Turns out, it’s not just having the right offer to the right market.

From what I understand, CRO is essentially improving customer touchpoints so that they do what we want them to do—take action! Whether it’s to take them to our product pages or sign up to our email list, we put an effort to make the process as enjoyable and frictionless as possible. And by doing so, we can help businesses grow and become more profitable.

CRO Basics

Brian Massey delivered a short (compared to the other lessons, at least) but fun talk about what CRO is all about.

It’s focused on ideas not tests

Yes, CRO involves tests but it’s looking at research and analytics to understand customers better. 

Statistics shouldn’t be scary

When it comes to CRO, numbers count. You need to ask relevant questions, get a bigger sample size, and have a good sample quality.

CRO Best Practices 

Peep Laja, the founder of CXL shared the best practices when it comes to conversion rate optimization. I liked that they have a point-by-point summary of these lessons.

E-commerce Conversion Rate Optimization

Since I’m more focused on helping e-commerce businesses, let me share some of my takeaways in this niche.

For e-commerce category pages, make sure to use filters to help customers narrow down their choices and get to the products they want to buy ASAP. And a left-hand filter is the usual way to do this.

When you have promotions, use self-explanatory product badges like Exclusive!, Most Popular, etc.

As for images, large well-presented products are better. Peep even cited a company that lined up 3 products with large images vs 5 products seen in small ones. Amazingly, this small tweak resulted in a whopping 25% increase in sales!

For buttons and call-to-actions, the golden rule is “Don’t make them think”. Moreover, use the sentence, “ I want to…” as a guide. 

Wondering which CTA to use for that web form? Well, anything but submit. People don’t like to submit. You can use “Click here.”

As for the checkout button, it needs to be at the top of the page. Keep reminding your customers about the perks of shopping with you such as trust badges, returns, alternative payment methods, and free shipping.

Persuasive Web Design

This is very important since we trust what we see. Yes, as they say, “Seeing is believing.”

5 Principles of Persuasive Web Design

Be clear and specific

Did you know that it only takes 50 milliseconds for us to make visual judgments? 

This means when somebody lands on your site, he or she needs to be able to instantly answer these 3 questions:

  1. What’s this?
  2. What do I do here? 
  3. What’s in it for me?

Keep visual appeal

You need to consider two things like visual complexity and familiarity. We’re drawn to simple things and those that are familiar to us. Don’t go for something too complicated.

Think of the visual hierarchy

What exactly does this mean? The biggest part is seen as the most important. Also, you need to use contrast to emphasize your call to action.

Always keep their attention

Here’s another fun fact: 80% of our attention is concentrated on the things that are located above the fold. 

That’s why you need to place your unique value proposition and call to action in that area.

One Action Per Page

Ask them to take action when they’re ready. However, when you have a product that’s complicated or like a big buy such as a car or a house, then you might like to use a long-form sales page with the above-the-fold for the value proposition.

Intro to Conversion Copywriting

This is my favorite part so far since as a direct response copywriter,  I use words to get people to take action NOW. But in this section,  I was able to learn more about how to apply CRO into the copy.

You need to optimize for clarity, information, and persuasion.

In order to do this, you need to steer away from bland and jargony (is this a word?) copy. Use simple and clear words that are conversational. We’re not going for a thesis or academic writing here. 

Make the copy about the people who are going to read and eventually buy from you. Use the words and phrases they would use.

Plus, forget the hype and superlatives that nobody would believe anyway.

Instead, be specific about how you can benefit your reader. What does your product do specifically to target his pain point? And then prove it with social proof.

Should you put all the info on one page? Not necessarily. As mentioned, when you have a course or product that’s complicated, you can go for a long-form sales page.

However, you can also put additional information on another page through a link. For example, if you’re selling computer software, you might like to put the technical details on another page.

What about pricing? A good rule of thumb is “Show value before price.”

If it’s affordable, you want everybody to know right? And if it’s expensive, you need qualified buyers to understand the value so they can decide to buy it.

Final Thoughts for Week 1

I thoroughly enjoyed the lessons I’ve had the past week. The lessons are well-organized and comprehensive. 

I’ll continue to share my thoughts in the weeks to come. Do look out for my next post as I share the best product messaging tips I got from conversion copywriter Momoko Price.

 

c74-1-yellow-navy-styled-stock-photo-pixistock-scaled

CXL Conversion Rate Optimization Foundations: Review

I’m so excited that I got into CXL Institute’s Conversion Rate Optimization minidegree program. To be honest, I was at first intimidated because it’s such an extensive topic but I’m so thrilled that I started it.

CXL Institute is a world leader in teaching advanced digital marketing skills. Yes, it’s the only platform where the world’s top marketing experts teach about CRO/UX, marketing, and analytics.

So, I’d be sharing some of my thoughts and best takeaways from this week’s lessons on CRO foundations. By the way, the entire minidegree is about 85 hours of video and online learning material so it’s pretty comprehensive.

Conversion Rate Optimization (CRO)

As a direct response copywriter, I’m always excited about conversions. But interestingly, I didn’t realize how other factors such as product messaging, social proof, and UX design affect conversion rates. Turns out, it’s not just having the right offer to the right market.

From what I understand, CRO is essentially improving customer touchpoints so that they do what we want them to do—take action! Whether it’s to take them to our product pages or sign up to our email list, we put an effort to make the process as enjoyable and frictionless as possible. And by doing so, we can help businesses grow and become more profitable.

CRO Basics

Brian Massey delivered a short (compared to the other lessons, at least) but fun talk about what CRO is all about.

It’s focused on ideas not tests

Yes, CRO involves tests but it’s looking at research and analytics to understand customers better. 

Statistics shouldn’t be scary

When it comes to CRO, numbers count. You need to ask relevant questions, get a bigger sample size, and have a good sample quality.

CRO Best Practices 

Peep Laja, the founder of CXL shared the best practices when it comes to conversion rate optimization. I liked that they have a point-by-point summary of these lessons.

 

E-commerce Conversion Rate Optimization

Since I’m more focused on helping e-commerce businesses, let me share some of my takeaways in this niche.

For e-commerce category pages, make sure to use filters to help customers narrow down their choices and get to the products they want to buy ASAP. And a left-hand filter is the usual way to do this.

When you have promotions, use self-explanatory product badges like Exclusive!, Most Popular, etc.

As for images, large well-presented products are better. Peep even cited a company that lined up 3 products with large images vs 5 products seen in small ones. Amazingly, this small tweak resulted in a whopping 25% increase in sales!

For buttons and call-to-actions, the golden rule is “Don’t make them think”. Moreover, use the sentence, “ I want to…” as a guide. 

Wondering which CTA to use for that web form? Well, anything but submit. People don’t like to submit. You can use “Click here.”

As for the checkout button, it needs to be at the top of the page. Keep reminding your customers about the perks of shopping with you such as trust badges, returns, alternative payment methods, and free shipping.

Persuasive Web Design

This is very important since we trust what we see. Yes, as they say, “Seeing is believing.”

5 Principles of Persuasive Web Design

Be clear and specific

Did you know that it only takes 50 milliseconds for us to make visual judgments? 

This means when somebody lands on your site, he or she needs to be able to instantly answer these 3 questions:

  1. What’s this?
  2. What do I do here? 
  3. What’s in it for me?

Keep visual appeal

You need to consider two things like visual complexity and familiarity. We’re drawn to simple things and those that are familiar to us. Don’t go for something too complicated.

Think of the visual hierarchy

What exactly does this mean? The biggest part is seen as the most important. Also, you need to use contrast to emphasize your call to action.

Always keep their attention

Here’s another fun fact: 80% of our attention is concentrated on the things that are located above the fold. 

That’s why you need to place your unique value proposition and call to action in that area.

One Action Per Page

Ask them to take action when they’re ready. However, when you have a product that’s complicated or like a big buy such as a car or a house, then you might like to use a long-form sales page with the above-the-fold for the value proposition.

 

Intro to Conversion Copywriting

This is my favorite part so far since as a direct response copywriter,  I use words to get people to take action NOW. But in this section,  I was able to learn more about how to apply CRO into the copy.

You need to optimize for clarity, information, and persuasion.

In order to do this, you need to steer away from bland and jargony (is this a word?) copy. Use simple and clear words that are conversational. We’re not going for a thesis or academic writing here. 

Make the copy about the people who are going to read and eventually buy from you. Use the words and phrases they would use.

Plus, forget the hype and superlatives that nobody would believe anyway.

Instead, be specific about how you can benefit your reader. What does your product do specifically to target his pain point? And then prove it with social proof.

Should you put all the info on one page? Not necessarily. As mentioned, when you have a course or product that’s complicated, you can go for a long-form sales page.

However, you can also put additional information on another page through a link. For example, if you’re selling computer software, you might like to put the technical details on another page.

What about pricing? A good rule of thumb is “Show value before price.”

If it’s affordable, you want everybody to know right? And if it’s expensive, you need qualified buyers to understand the value so they can decide to buy it.

Final Thoughts for Week 1

I thoroughly enjoyed the lessons I’ve had the past week. The lessons are well-organized and comprehensive. 

I’ll continue to share my thoughts in the weeks to come. Do look out for my next post as I share the best product messaging tips I got from conversion copywriter Momoko Price.